from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: the time has come …

7 November, 2021.

… to take a break.

We started this blog in March 2020 with the bold plan to record stories from connected friends and colleagues across the world. There was hope that we would all find the strength to adapt to Covid-19. There was a certain sense of excitement: a challenge, something that would cause our communities to work together to survive. Our diary was an ambitious plan to chronicle the events of our far-flung lives during Covid-19. We were energised; we were going to be proactive.  

However, I don’t think any of us imagined that the pandemic would last as long as it has, nor that it would change the world in the ways that it has. The numbers are staggering – between 10.5 and 19.7 million people have died. The story of Covid-19 will take years to process.

Here below are the November 2021 numbers of people who have died: on the left are the official statistics, on the right the excess deaths calculated by the Economist using a statistical model. It is more likely to be the true story of the devastation of Covid-19.

November 2021. Twenty months later. Slowly, our writers have stopped writing for this blog: for many reasons. As any writer will tell you, it is hard keeping up the energy and enthusiasm month after month. The pandemic has been exhausting. We all hoped for more out of life; our world has been squeezed shut. Being of an age, we did not have the sense of having a wealth of years left in which to travel, to feel free, to have options. Health issues are getting more stark for all of us. (For example, I asked a provider if I could get travel insurance that covered the possibility of getting Covid-19 while overseas. I found out that some insurance providers will comply – but at a price, and the cover is limited. Can I travel to the USA without Covid-19 cover? Not advisable.)

https://www.smartraveller.gov.au/our-services/resources/choice-travel-insurance-guide-covid-19

Recently, there were two of us still submitting entries to this blog: David Maughan-Brown and me. Gradually we have become more and more intermittent. For me, it is becoming harder to write. Do we want to spend our hours staring at a computer screen?

However, there are reasons to celebrate. The original team of writers have all survived Covid-19. Maybe we are coming to the beginning of the end of the pandemic. We are getting on with the minutiae of our private lives. My USA friends are visiting Greece, and our Australian borders have started the process of opening. Already our local skies have contrails: dissolving white lines across the blue.

The devastating effects of Covid-19 are known to all of us. The onslaught of news might be one of the reasons for our exhaustion.

In what ways has Covid-19 had a positive influence on our lives and the broader world? At first, I struggled to find any good news, but there is some.

  • A great value has been placed on medical research and innovation.
  • We have become closer to friends and family.
  • We are encouraged to be more aware of our health challenges: we appreciate good health. We have enjoyed meals at home more often, and we have tried to be more careful with our food choices.
  • More social services are available: many countries have rolled our financial support during Covid-19.
  • Working from home became a new normal for many people and will influence work routines of the future.
  • Online events posted by museums and art institutions became available.
  • The environment has had a breather. Emissions are down; biodiversity improved in many places as tourists were grounded.
  • Online learning techniques were improved: the classroom was digitised.
  • Where possible, we have exercised more!

So it’s goodbye!

Thank you to all who have taken part: the writers for their commitment to write and the readers who have taken the time to be with us. Take care of yourselves.

As Lewis Carroll said, so well, the time comes … but remember to avoid suspicious invitations!

O Oysters,’ said the Carpenter,

      You’ve had a pleasant run!

Shall we be trotting home again?’      

But answer came there none —

from Steph in London: If you’re not bothered about uplift …

June 4. Shiny graphs galore and an inbuilt belief that, if they look good, they will be telling the truth and, even more importantly, will be proving we are not the worst country in Europe and nearly the worst country in the world for the virus … David Blunkett when Minister of Education once said, “Learn to measure what you value not value what you measure”. It might help!

Shutting the borders so that those countries with a worse record than ours don’t send people over to contaminate us … I am sure that the fact that we are (almost) the worst country in the world will mean that anybody with any sense will keep a wide berth of the UK for ages.

In the meantime we wait and watch to see what happens with the freedom that has been given to us … there are definitely more cars around. Five of the grandchildren are back in school 3 days a week, one is having a full day of lessons on line much to her horror and the others are getting very much  better at table tennis and baking cakes. The six-year olds spend the day in ‘bubbles’ of 15 with 2 teachers. They do everything together and are separated from everybody else at break and lunch time. Then when they are dismissed at 3-ish they all pile into the playground, throw themselves at their friends from other bubbles then go home.

 My eldest son is planning to be working at home until December with the younger members of the team going into the office on a fortnightly rota. The logic of that is that the “youngsters” may not have the space at home to work there long term and the oldies (those over 35!) who can work in a separate room will do so, and just visit the office once a week for the odd meeting.

Life has become strangely more agitated for us all. Do we go out? With gloves, a mask, nothing? We’ve bought disposable cups for friends so we can serve coffee (in gloves) and safely. Are we being totally neurotic and is the R number in London only .4? It was strangely calmer when the world had stopped … but it is the summer and if it had gone on into the winter there would have been many (more) stir crazy households.

So, the conversation about uplift was a joy – two very jolly over 80s discussing comfortable underwear.

The rest is censored …

from David Vincent in Shrewsbury, UK: miscounting

June 3.  The puzzle is why Matt Hancock thought he could get away with it.

Everyone knew that his claims for the level of coronavirus tests included multiple swab tests for the same individual, posted tests, pregnancy tests, driving tests, eyesight tests (the last two another form of double counting in Cummings land).

Yesterday he received a magisterial rebuke from the chair of the UK Statistical Authority, Sir David Norgrove:

Statistics on testing perhaps serve two main purposes [lovely use of mock diffidence in the ‘perhaps’].  The first is to help us understand the epidemic, alongside the ONS survey, showing us how many people are infected, or not, and their relevant characteristics.  The second is to help manage the test programme… The way the data are analysed and presented currently gives them limited value for the first purpose.  The aim seems to be to show the largest possible number of tests, even at the expense of understanding.  It is also hard to believe the statistics work to support the testing programme itself.  The statistics and analysis serve neither purpose well.

Hancock and his fellow ministers seem to have forgotten that in earlier moments of virtue, previous governments have set up a series of bodies to keep them numerically honest – the UK Statistical Authority, the Office for Budget Responsibility, the Office for National Statistics (ONS), amongst others.  These are staffed by competent, principled, number-crunchers who appear at times to take a positive pleasure in pointing out the official misuse of data.

It is not that Norgrove himself is new to the game.  He has been in office since 2017, and on 17 September 2019, he wrote to the then Foreign Secretary, one B. Johnson, about the Brexit Bus: 

I am surprised and disappointed that you have chosen to repeat the figure of £350 million per week, in connection with the amount that might be available for extra public spending when we leave the European Union.  This confuses gross and net contributions.  It also assumes that payments currently made to the UK by the EU, including for example for the support of agriculture and scientific research, will not be paid by the UK government when we leave. It is a clear misuse of official statistics.

The explanation of these repeat offences is not innumeracy, but rather a varying approach to the function of figures.  In the case of the bus, Cummings had correctly calculated that it did not matter if the numbers were challenged.  The mere act of discussing the claim, up to and including Norgrove’s letter, anchored in the public mind that there was a substantial cost to EU membership.

Similarly, Hancock, desperately trying to defeat the coronavirus, seems to have calculated that the only way to mobilise action is to set and report huge targets, so as to create a boiling mass of activity amongst those charged with delivering outcomes.  As anyone involved in running large organisations knows, there are more sober, disciplined, forms of project management, but Hancock seems entirely to lack the mental or practical resources to use these.

I came across this process when working on my book on solitude.  As I reached the present, Theresa May published the world’s first strategy for tackling loneliness.  When I examined the figures she was using, I found that her claim that 20% of the population was lonely was contradicted by data in the same document from the ONS, which had calculated a figure of 5% (the same figure as lately reported by the Nuffield / UCL study discussed in the diary entry for May 27).  But it was the larger headline figure that featured in the press release accompanying the strategy, and in the subsequent public discussion.   Statistical accuracy was subordinated to the need to dramatize a newly foregrounded social condition.

It was not difficult for a toiling researcher into the past to work this out.  Historians can count when they need to. 

Guess what is the subject Sir David Norgrove’s Oxford degree. 

Look it up if you don’t believe me.