from Anne in Adelaide, South Australia: steps towards normal – with a QR Code.

December 2.

warnings are getting more graphic!

You will be happy to hear that the news from South Australia is good.

Australians love to use the word, ‘good’.

‘How are you?’

‘I am good!’

We seem to be escaping from the recent predictions of community spread. There has been a flurry of testing since November 18 when it was feared that we were in for a significant outbreak and a severe lockdown was imposed and as quickly lifted.

But new measures are now in place: we have a process of checking in with your smart phone whenever you enter a public place or club – it’s Called ‘COVID SAfe Check-In’ and this allows our SA Health to follow up on contacts with more efficiency. (The SA capitalised in ‘SAfe’ is for South Australia). You read the QR code using your smart phone camera and up pops a table where you enter your details. I think this is the way forward for the next year – or so.

The problem is many people of a certain age do not have a smart phone or find it difficult to work this technology. I foresee long queues of people waiting outside venues as they struggled to adapt. But it can be done and it should be done without too much grumbling.

This week I went to our Adelaide Central Market for the first time this year. Our central market is a joy to all Adelaideans. It is located right in the centre of the city with easy cheap parking above the trading halls. It promotes itself as one of the largest undercover fresh produce markets in the southern hemisphere.

strawberries, mangoes, apricots and peaches are IN

It was opened in 1870 and locals like nothing better than to shop on a Saturday morning and have a breakfast there as well. There are 70 traders. Perhaps in London terms this is not large but it is perfect for our little city. The range of fruit, small goods, cheeses, flowers, cakes and pastries, seafood, spice shops, and quirky trendy outlets makes for a shopping spree. There is even an exotic food shop called Something Wild, selling exotic meats such as camel, emu, feral goat, crocodile and kangaroo as well as native greens.

https://www.broadsheet.com.au/adelaide/shops/something-wild

I was on a mission. Having had some time to clear out one of those cupboards filled with ‘things-we-don’t-use’ and ‘things-we-will-never-use’, I took a bag of old camera bits and pieces (Nikon, Tamron, Minolta) to the camera shop in the market. (In spite of mild protest from my husband). They don’t want digital cameras for resale, only the old analog SLRs for students learning photography. I am happy that my once precious cameras might be used once more. Better than the bin.

Locals getting their morning coffee fix

Then, lightened physically and mentally, I enjoyed breakfast in the market, watched masked police collecting their cappuccinos, and admired the wonderful spread of goodies on offer.

I felt old times might be returning.

From John in Brighton: What a Load of Rubbish!

Rubbish on a remote Indonesian island

12 June. It was instilled into me at a young age that you don’t leave litter. I don’t recall so many public bins back in the 60’s and the message was clear – pack up your rubbish, take it home and bin it. On the face of it not difficult to understand or to execute so why has litter been a thorn in our side for as long as I can remember?.
Yesterday evening in a local park was an overflowing bin and litter strewn all around – a small vignette of a much bigger problem. One hot weekend last summer 23 tons of rubbish were collected off the Brighton and Hove beaches and the Council planned for a further 300 new bins over a stretch of about eight miles along the sea front. This included recycling so blue for plastic bottles and cans, maroon for glass and black for ordinary rubbish. Again I’d ask, what could be simpler? But there’s a sense of deja vu with the recent burst of hot weather and the beach near the pier had an ugly coating of nappies, wipes, takeaway items, cans and drinks bottles aplenty. Enough in fact for volunteers to fill twenty five bags of 5 Litre volume over about a three mile stretch. 
And it’s not just the beaches but also the parks. Preston Park, Brighton’s largest, might take park attendant Bill at least a couple of hours to clear after a hot day he tells us on the local radio. And last spring 500 bags of rubbish were collected from two of the main roads in Sussex the A27 and A23 – some may have blown in but the majority probably expelled from drivers’ windows. Yet go up on the nearby Downs and litter is practically non-existent as witnessed by a ten mile cycle this week and spotting one item. Perhaps this simply reflects a far lower number of people but I suspect also a different mentality. And maybe if you see no rubbish it induces you to follow suit, positive reinforcement even if there is no tangible reward..
I try to understand why people leave so much rubbish. Is it simply laziness or lack of facilities? Often bins are overflowing but isn’t the appropriate response to find another even if that means taking it home? Is it a perception that it’s somebody else’s responsibility to sort – “that’s what they’re paid for”, except that they aren’t and a lot of the clearing rests with volunteers? A lack of any civic pride – maybe it’s the band of London day-trippers who are solely responsible but I doubt it. Or just a lack of self-discipline, perhaps exacerbated by the restrictions of lockdown and the new-found freedoms nurturing a low-level anomie? But last summer’s findings predate Covid and imply a more chronic problem. Or maybe it’s quite simply the absence of any consequence – identifying culprits is practically impossible. Politicians repeatedly praise the adherence of the general public to the lockdown so the principles of self-discipline are well understood but regardless of rules and directives from on high arguably the biggest incentive there is avoiding a potentially life-threatening disease. No one dies from leaving a bit of litter………but fauna might. The plastic pollution of the oceans and its consequences have been highlighted in the last couple of years. Recently there have been reports of micro-plastics in rivers and affecting the bird life, not all of it from litter but it may contribute. And better still for the miscreant is the difficulty of policing litter louts – last year Brighton introduced a team of “litter cops” and the threat of a £300 fine but how can they effectively patrol a large area 24/7 although the threat might be a subliminal deterrent to some? After a leave of absence the enforcement officers re-emerged last week so I’m hoping for a cleaner city as the summer progresses but won’t hold my breath and I still question why such a measure is needed.
Education and Public Information Films have been tried – going back to the 60’s Roy Hudd did one. Then there was that catchy slogan “Find a Bin To Put It In” so I fear this may be as difficult to unravel as the Gordian knot and will remain an issue in another fifty years time. But it’s not all bad. Back to the 60’s and the footpaths were littered with faeces (usually canine)  but no longer.  An eighty quid fine surely helps to focus the attention but again I suspect the mindset and understanding the rationale is the most important thing. Again it begs the question as to how people generally comply with this but not so well with garbage disposal.