From John in Brighton: DNA

28 July

Potentially an existential issue – but not the double helix and its crucial role to life but rather the future of the restaurant industry. Within a fortnight of the hospitality services resuming, albeit with reduced numbers and other restrictions, restaurant hosts up and down the land bemoan those who book and then don’t materialise at the appointed time. I suspect this is not a new issue but more sharply focussed in these straitened and challenging times. The most outspoken was Tom Kerridge who had 27 no shows at his bar and grill restaurant on a single Saturday night. He emphasised that such selfishness could be the tipping point for the industry which is “already on the verge of collapse”.

Welcome to our world Tom. DNA’s, Did Not Attend, have been a perennial problem in the NHS for as long as I can remember. An outpatient clinic appointment is booked for a certain date and time but the patient is conspicuous only by their absence. Figures vary from place to place and between specialities but on average 8% of appointments (just under 8 million in 2017-8) are not honoured. With each missed appointment typically costing approximately £120 that represents around £1 billion to be coughed up. Not to be sneezed at (even with a mask on). Speaking on Question Time exactly five years ago Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt expressed a personal preference for charging patients for missed appointments. The complexity of administering this and, I suspect, political unpopularity led by the other Jeremy meant it went no further. At the same sitting he also denounced patients who simply failed to take their prescribed medications which is another chronic wastage – so be grateful Tom, at least people swallow your food. The year after Hunt’s rant the body termed NHS Improvement was set up and in a report on “Reducing DNA’s” cited clerical errors and patients forgetting as the commonest reasons amongst several. To counteract these factors many clinics asked patients to ring in and book an appointment personally and then followed later with a reminder text a day or two before the consultation….but sadly not a panacea and still appointments go to waste.

Another ploy in the NHS is to book one or two extra patients in expectation of the absentees – bad news if it’s neither raining nor the World Cup and everyone turns up. But that’s less practical in the restaurant trade and especially with enforced social distancing. And the NHS is not a business whereas a restaurant’s bottom line and staff livelihoods depend on maintaining income. The current white hope for NHS appointments is to give patients the option of booking and changing appointments online. If it works in hospitals then perhaps it could be an option in hospitality as well. But until then a more immediate potential solution is to ask for a deposit at booking with a full refund should cancellation occur at least forty eight hours prior to the meal. To no show with impunity is ignorant and rude – maybe a forfeit would concentrate the mind. Interestingly, but perhaps unsurprising, is that psychologists have demonstrated that people value things more if they have had to pay towards them. The only difficulty I can envisage is the client taken genuinely ill on the day of the booking.
At the end of the day surely a key factor is that both action and inaction have consequences and we all have a personal responsibility for “doing the right thing” as the Tory mantra so often tells us. The NHS may be free at the point of delivery but that doesn’t mean that financial considerations are irrelevant and we all need to use the service responsibly and judiciously. Equally the patrons of restaurants have a duty to respect those providing them with a service and whose livelihoods depend on it.