from Anne in Adelaide, Australia and Kellie on Norfolk Island: overseas to an ‘external territory’

Remains of the Penal Settlement – with the famous Norfolk island ‘pines’

September 24. Norfolk island is an ‘external territory’ of Australia, 1,400 odd km east of mainland Australia and closer to New Zealand than Australia. The flight to the island takes 2.5 hours. 1,700+ people live on the island and they have a distinct culture and history. It is famous or infamous for its history as a brutal penal settlement (1788-1855) and for the arrival of the Pitcairn ‘refugees’ (descendants of Tahitians and the HMS Bounty mutineers) in 1856.

Currently, there are no Covid-19 cases on the Island and after 4 months of strict isolation, Norfolk Islanders are encouraging visitors from the mainland (except tourists from our state of Victoria).

My cousin’s daughter, Kellie, is working on Norfolk Island. Thanks to her, I have a little insight into the island. Here are some of Kellie’s observations with my cousin Patricia’s photographs.

Kellie: “Life on the island is very interesting. Norfolk Island is about 8 km long and 5 km wide. The islanders have their own language called Norfulk which is a different language (NB. It is a blend of 18th-century English and Tahitian, originally introduced by Pitkern-speaking settlers from the Pitcairn Islands. Along with English, it is the co-official language of Norfolk Island).

The culture is also interesting. When a person passes away, they fly the flags at ½ mask and on the day of the funeral they also fly the flags at ½ mask. This is done all over the island.

Supplies are brought to Norfolk Island and trans-shipped by tender.

If you have an emergency, (e.g. heart attack) you are medevacked off the island. Our hospital does not have the doctors or facilities for such emergencies. Also, if you are having a child you need to go over to the mainland to give birth. With anything more complex with health care we need to head back to the mainland for attention.

Our phone system is owned by Norfolk Telecom. For me to phone my mother on the mainland, it is an international phone call. All mobiles here are prepaid numbers.

Historic gravestone on Norfolk. They all face the sunrise.

Currently, my work place is down at Kingston and Vale History Area (KAVHA) and the building is also historic. It is really nice there as I work on the top floor and able to look at the ocean each day from my windows.

https://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/national/kavha

All vegetables are grown on the Island. I have to really know what is in season for my meal. This includes fresh fruit. I bought some mandarins and bananas at the markets on Saturday. A ship which comes in every 3 months with all other supplies. The ship used to come in every month but it is decommissioned now due to age.

I am lucky that I have made some really nice friends here. These friends have made my life living on the island a blessing. We go out for dinner every Friday night. After dinner we head off to the RSL for the raffles. They also have invited me to Bounty Day celebrations.

This week we are celebrating 75 years of Peace in the Pacific. They have something going on every day this week which should be interesting. They have a vintage vehicle street parade on Saturday which I am hoping to make it to. Also, on Saturday night they have Celebrate Peace night.

It has been a difficult year with Covid-19. I was meant to head off on holidays in May/June for 3 weeks but I was unable to leave the island. I just have to wait now until it is safe.

Previously, if you came to Norfolk Island from NSW, ACT or Victoria you had to isolate for 2 week this includes if you overnight in any of these places.”

Anne: I did not know that there was a distinct language on Norfolk Island. So, I looked up Norfulk. Here are some words to consider. I think they are most expressive – samples below. I would love to visit Norfolk Island … I will put it on the ‘travel list’ that I am compiling!

Let me try some Norfulk : Trump is car-do and the world is bussup…..??

https://www.discovernorfolkisland.com/norfolk/language.html

Bussup – Broken in pieces
Carfoot – Don’t know why
Car-do – No Good
Deffy – This way
Daffy – That way
Do-mine – Never mind
Dem – Those
Dar-de-way – That’s the way
Dars-et – That’s it
Estolley – Untrue
Foot nort – Why not
Fuwa – Why
Gurret – Angry
Gwen – Going
He-he – Periwinkles
Hilli – Lazy, dopey
Ho-ya – Peculiar
Hattay – Here it is
Ippy – A silly person

from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: Sewerage with your salmon, sir?

September 21.

Nineteen years ago, I read the June 21st article in the Economist, headed with this challenging and half-amusing title: ‘Sewerage with your salmon, sir?’ I have never forgotten it. Some articles fall on fertile ground! I had, mistakenly, thought that farmed salmon was a good food choice. After reading this article (about salmon ‘farms’ in Scotland), I learnt a lot about farmed salmon. I also learnt it was cruel.

‘Salmon are kept at higher densities than battery hens. Packed in cages of up to 70m in diameter, holding up to 500,000 fish, they are fattened on a diet of the rendered remains of small fish. Anti-bacterial chemicals are used to ward off sea lice and other parasites. Colouring agents are included in their pellet food because, deprived of its natural diet of krill and shrimp, the flesh of a farmed salmon looks an uninviting shade of grey. Roche sells a colouring agent, called Salmofan, which allows salmon farmers to choose the exact shade of pink they like for their fish.’

That was just the beginning of my education about farmed salmon. The excreta from the fish falls to the bottom of the fiords where, in certain weather conditions, it is stirred up into the pens and eaten by the fish. The pollution affects the wild fish and resultant levels of parasites (lice) are unacceptable (and the lice jump onto the wild salmon). The same story is found in Canada and north-western USA.

Since writing for this Covid-19 diary, I have noticed that any of my posts that feature food and cooking gets more ‘likes’. Food is popular! I believe this reflects our current anxiety about what we are eating. Are we keeping healthy? Are we looking after our immune systems? When the virus invades us, will we have the physical resources to survive it? Especially if you ‘suffer’ from the co-morbidly of age, your health is a matter of extra concern.

Eating less meat, more fish, more vegetables, is discussed. Getting enough sleep, enough exercise is also promoted. We are trying.

Can you add to this a concern about how our food is produced? How is it farmed? Are our meat chickens raised in cages? Do we need to drink cow’s milk? Do we need to eat veal? Should we include more vegetarian meals in our at-home cooking?

Along this line of thought, I decided I would check on the latest news about salmon farming in Scotland. Surely, in the 19 years since ‘Sewerage with your salmon, sir?’ the situation would have improved in the fiords of Scotland.

No! They have not!

Production of salmon has increased since 2001 from 127,000 tonnes to 189,000 tonnes in 2017.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-48266480

This article explains that wild salmon numbers are at their lowest levels since records began – experts talk about a ‘crisis’. Lice numbers on wild fish are at epidemic levels. Effectively, the fish gets eaten alive …. Severe injuries are found on the farmed salmon and apparently the inspectors have trouble recording this!

Marine ecologist Dr Sally Campbell says: “I think most people who choose salmon off their supermarket shelves have no idea of the waste that’s going into our marine environment as a result of that. And they would be appalled.”

Every year about 9.5 million fish die in the salmon farms, about 20% of the total.

Disease, parasites and even chemicals designed to treat them can all prove fatal.’

If you have read this far, I should apologise in bringing you this bad news when you already have enough going on.

Why worry about fish, you might ask. Do not worry – just check out the guides and buy accordingly.

https://www.mcsuk.org/goodfishguide/search

Meanwhile, I should think twice about eating our local Tasmanian farmed salmon (which has been a favourite). It’s easy to get advice on what ‘sustainable-stock’ fish I should eat. Keep away from the top predators: marlin, sailfish, tuna, farmed salmon. Keep away from fish that are caught with a huge bycatch.

I am pleased to say that the crabs and southern calamari that I used to catch on our Yorke Peninsula are deemed sustainable. In Australia they have generous bag-limits for crabs and calamari.

Now summer is approaching, I shall have to go fishing again.

from Louis in Johannesburg: South African (SA) socio/political dynamics-an anthropologist view

September 20.

“Those who were seen dancing, were thought to be insane, by those who couldn’t hear the music.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

During the Democratic Alliance (DA) reign of Mmusi Maimane, Gwen Ngwenya was appointed in 2019 head of policy. Her nonracial policy pronouncements went unheard by the party leadership at the time. Fast forward to September 2020, her policy emerges once more from the DA national convention to an aggressive chorus of condemnation from mainstream media and various members of the commentariat. 

A few voices that criticize Gwen Ngwenya also consider that she may in future be seen as a thought leader: the first person to apply critical thinking to the issue of non-racialist policy. ‘Racist’ being used in a pejorative sense and ‘racialist’ being used in an anthropological sense. At least the current DA leadership seem to be listening.

https://www.da.org.za/why-the-da/values-and-principles

The ruling party in South Africa have yet to reach what may be called “their Magna Carta moment”. England reached this moment in 1215 and laid the foundations for the rule of law and protection of property rights from the vagaries of tribal chiefs and kings. The Charter of the Forest of 1217 a companion document protected the rights of commoners to plant crops for family sustenance, gather fuel and graze their cattle. It was never meant as a basis for possessing large tracks of land as basis for wealth. These foundational documents provide the basis where the spirit and the letter of the constitution hold citizens to account through a process of self-regulation, as well as the rule of law through independent judges and the courts. In South Africa we have a way to go to catch up to England of 1215 and 1217? When we look back from 2040, we may mark this moment as the watershed that took us away from a relativist world of politics and policy implementation to an analytical, evidence-based world of policy.

As the Nationalist Party copied its colonial masters so the ANC alliance has emulated the Nationalist Party government insofar as race-based policies are concerned. No new thinking in sight. So much for ANC non-racialism. One of the ANC founding documents, the Freedom Charter from Kliptown, Soweto in 1955, speaks clearly of non-racialism, non-sexist and a country that belongs to all who live in it. However, the current crop of ANC leaders choose to emulate the apartheid racist policies including racial classification.

A well-known SA industrialist once said, in all revolutions there is damage, in the South African revolution the damage has been to the quality of thinking. We seem to have sunk into a morass of relativist thinking where critical thinking is almost entirely lacking. Even main-stream journalists seem to be in an echo chamber where they pass ignorance around as analysis and insight.

Past President Zuma continues to ask these same journalists “Tell me what have I done wrong?”

What he means is that he has not been found guilty in any court of law of any crime. I think he with many others believe, notwithstanding allegations based on investigations that they are complying with the rule of law, huh?

All of this when critical race theory and a firestorm of cancel culture in the USA the UK and elsewhere in the west, fueled by non-liberal thinking threatens to undermine western democratic foundations. It reminds me of how Mao used the Red Guards to remove any traditional cultural reminders which were in accordance with Maoist philosophy holding society back, so-doing opening the way for the great leap forward.

IMHO Gwen Ngwenya’s non-racial policy offers us the first glimpse of principle-based policy where what may be called radical non-racialism, is central. (Policy Document available on request – health warning 58-page document!). As the beloved Archbishop Desmond Tutu reminds us there is no African version of principles and values. This may be confusing to many. Ngwenya’s policy document goes unrecognised by mainstream media as thought leadership, for now. So what’s new? Galileo, Darwin, Martin Luther King Junior, van Zyl-Slabbert and Smuts. These visionaries, ahead of their times, had to endure emotional criticism from “those who could not hear the music.”

Classical liberalism reflected in the metrics of The Heritage Foundation, The Fraser institute and the Cato Institute has an undeniable association with wealth creation.

“Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism which advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic freedom. Closely related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanisation and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America (Wikipedia  2020).

from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: Rain!

Weather front approaching

September 20. September in Adelaide is the last month of the year in which we hope to receive a reasonable amount of rain. Our mean rainfall for the first month of spring is 2 inches or 50 ml. Bear in mind that our annual rainfall is 525ml. (21 inches). Some say South Australia is the driest state in the driest continent in the world. It sure feels like that at the moment.

This year, our winter rainfall was only 60 % of the average. You can see this in the hardness of the soil when you dig. Summer lies ahead with those challenging weeks of furiously high temperatures and no rain.

Witchelina creek – long long without water.

I returned from our recent trip up north acutely aware of the devastation that the drought has had on the countryside. So I started watching the 28-day forecast of possible rain that is produced by Elders Weather – hoping for rain for the stations we had returned from. They get their rain from monsoonal troughs arriving from the north. And in the last few days, one arrived.

Witchelina, Farina and the Marree area received close to 100ml of rain (4 inches). The Flinders Ranges recieved a little less. Flood warnings were broadcast with images of swollen creeks. A godsend. Our ABC news was full of the wonder of this record downpour, as farmers rejoiced.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-09-19/record-rain-has-sa-outback-stations-rejoicing/12681156

So we waited in Adelaide, hoping for the meagre 20 mm (1 inch) that was forecast for last Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The clouds were dark but no rain fell … a few showers passed south over Kangaroo Island. I started watering the garden again.

Today’s Bureau of Meterology radar.

Today, Sunday, the skies were full of sound and fury and once more in anticipation I examined the local radar – a narrow band of orange, red and black approached us from the west. We got some rain! Only 5ml over half an hour, but so very welcome.

Later, I walked out in the dark to set our two feral cat traps (yes, we are trapping feral cats with help from our council) and the bush seemed to be singing.

from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: Farina – travelling to an Outback ghost town

September 13.

Farina township, established in 1876, is now 7 hours due north of Adelaide, 630 kms on good roads. You can leave home at 8am, stop for tea in Port Wakefield, a lamb pie in Port Augusta, coffee and a Quandong pie in Hawker and arrive into the ghost town around 4pm. Without speeding.

But pause. Farina was once a month’s ride away or two months if you were on a wagon. Farina, for me, stands as an example of the struggles endured by Australia’s early settlers. You cannot but admire their tenacity at the same time you acknowledge their ignorance of this country.

It would have been a harsh lesson in an unforgiving land.

On our recently trip to Witchelina Nature Reserve, 30 kms west of Farina, we travelled this route north, taking in the landscape as it changed, as the green became brown, as the trees shrunk and disappeared, as the towns became smaller, as the wedge-tailed eagles (Australia’s vultures) became more numerous lifting from the roadside off dead kangaroos. Heartbreak land. Hard to love, hard to survive.

Kanyaka Station – half way to Farina – was established in 1851. Early on, there were 41,000 sheep on the property. In 1867, 20,000 sheep died in the drought.

We did not want to be depressed. This was our keenly anticipated holiday after 6 months of being home-bound thinking of little more than family and the issues of the daily news: how many new cases of Covid-19? How were our children doing in the USA? In Australia? In South Africa?

We were escaping to look at the landscape and geologyof the Adelaide Superbasin. We would have experts: geology professors and practitioners, biologists and bird watchers in our group. We would be beyond the reaches of WiFi. No TV, no shops. We were looking forward to evening discussions, communal meals and shearers’ quarters for 8 nights.

Farina landscape

Farina lasted for many years after the dreams of wheat and barley farming faded with the rain decreasing to the normal levels of 6.5 inches a year. The town, at its maximum had 600 people: Aboriginal people, Afghan cameleers and European immigrants. Once there was water at Farina but it did not last. The town only struggled on after the 1890s due to the railway line – closed in 1980.

The empty rooms of Farina

Over the years, it has become a ruin and a tourist attraction for Outback travellers in their A-Vans and sleek Ultimate Caravans. A café is being established there with an underground bakery. Winter is the time for the Outback when the days are warm and sunny and nights cold. In summer the temperatures can reach 50 degrees.

There is something that draws us in awe to these golden stone ruins, stark in the gibber plains. No roofs remain. The walls impress all who stand before them: the massive rectangular rocks that form the lintels last the longest, holding up the doorways and chimney places. You have to admire the workmanship that went into the stonework. There is confidence in these buildings as well as a warning for the hubris of those who ignore nature.

Arriving at Witchelina Nature Reserve

Our group passed through Farina in our 4-WDs, complete with spare tyres, Air-Con, Satellite phones, 2-way radios, GPs, cameras the size of a pack of cards, binoculars and bottles of spring water. If those early settlers could have seen us what would they think?

from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: staying fit without Aged Care

September 11. It’s been six months since our Australian society got into panic mode over Covid-19. At first, there was the rush to secure our food supplies. Rumours abounded. A little later, we worried about exercise. As organised sport, gyms and council programs were halted we Zoomed into gym sessions or went out and walked the parks and streets.

Over time in South Australia, we have been lucky enough to relax –  a lot. We can now play tennis, go to restaurants, cinemas, play bridge and have guests at home. We can travel within South Australia, the Northern Territory and fly to Queensland.

I have resumed attending weekly yoga lessons at our local council hub. As an older person, health has become something I worry about a little bit more than before. It’s not just issues around COVID-19, but a sense that we need to look after ourselves – after all we have co-morbidities. To this end, I decided to go extend my program by going to the Pilates class also offered at my council hub. Pilates teachers talk non-stop about the ‘core’: the weakening ‘core’ as we age! No doubt, my body is in decline. Yoga is not enough.

So, I attended my first Pilates class and I enjoyed it very much and hoped to continue. However, I was told I needed approval from My Aged Care; this Pilates class was subsidised by our Federal Government for older people to enjoy. All the other attendees looked of a similar age and fitness to myself. I felt I would fit in.

My Aged Care was introduced in July 2013 by our Federal Government. The idea is to make it easier for older people to be assessed and supported with various services. I think the plan is to keep people in their homes, as fit as possible and as long as possible, so that they do not burden the old age homes or the medical system.

I already had an Aged Care number which is readily given to people older than 65.

I mistakenly thought this would be a simple process: I would phone up and explain that I would like to attend the Pilates class (citing the need for ‘core’ strengthening!). Obviously, it would make me fitter and stronger and more able to stay in my own home for years to come, thus being less of a liability on the government. Logical.

Not so fast. The kind woman at Aged Care informed me that I would need an ‘assessment’ before they would approve me for this one hour, once a week, Pilates class.

I hoped that this could be done with a few simple questions conducted over the phone. No. An appointment was made for me for an assessment in my own home.

‘Did I have a dog?

‘Yes,’ I said.

‘Please could the dog be locked up before the assessment’.

‘Sure,’ I said.

I was now in the system and I did not pull out  – also I was a little curious.

So last week, Trisha, from Aged Care, came to our house. She asked me to open the door (she did not want to touch the handle) and she made sure that we were socially distanced. I offered her tea or coffee. She said she was not allowed to have tea, coffee or even a glass of water. I told her that my almost toothless one-eyed Roy dog (desperate to greet her) was locked away. She said that the interview would take approximately one hour. I was bemused.

Trisha took out her laptop and said she had to go through the whole assessment. The questions were thorough – here are just a few of them: Did I have a social life? Friends? What did I do with my time? What kids did we have and where were they? Did we talk to them? Could I shower myself? Did I have handrails in the shower? She counted all our steps in the house. Could she see our bathroom? (That surprised me). Could I drive and shop on my own? Could I cook? What pain symptoms did I have? Did I have my own teeth? What medication did I take? Did I use pill boxes? etc ….

Forty-five minutes, later Trisha told me, apologising profusely, that she could not give me a ‘package’ because if she gave me a package someone else would not be able to have one.

‘You are fit,’ she said. ‘I’m sorry – you are not isolated.’

I lamely said I did not want a package. I just wanted to attend Pilates and was happy to pay the federal government extra part of the cost ($10). Uh-huh! No way was this possible.

Trisha left after telling me that I should be pleased that I was ‘on the system’ because if anything happened to me, they had all the data about my life!!! They sure did!

The kind of services My Aged Care offer to elderly people is impressive. I had had no idea of the range and scale of the support offered. I must say that we are lucky to live in a society that has put in place such services. But I am somewhat horrified by the bureaucracy that it involves. And its inflexibility.

Recently, I read the Economist magazine’s special feature on dementia where they reported on this looming world-wide crisis. I wonder for how long Australia can afford to support their ageing population in the Aged Care way. In 2107, 15% of our population was 65 and over. (9% in 1977). Growing steadily. People are living longer as well. Our Federal treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, says our ageing population is ‘an economic time bomb’.

Never fear. I can go to my Next Generation club – further away – for Pilates classes but it’s not so friendly and filled with lithe young mothers in Nike and Lululemon lycra gear. So be it. I am quite pleased that I was rejected for an Aged Care package. Obviously, I am too fit, too busy. For the moment.

from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: more on our escape north – walking on orchids

September 7.

Blue-beard native orchid

After we climbed out of Alligator Gorge on our trip north, last week, we walked through the eucalyptus forest to a lookout. One of our members is a botanist and she identified the spring flowers along the path. And then she pointed out tiny orchids. Many South Australian orchid species have never been scientifically described.

I have always loved orchids. In Zanzibar my mother collected them – we drove through Jozani Forest looking for epiphytic orchids that trailed from the tropical trees. In Durban, South Africa, orchids grew profusely in our gardens. They were large spectacular species and did not need cosseting. Each year the blooms multiplied. Adelaide, Australia has a perfect climate for cymbidiums as long as you can protect them from summer heatwaves. Give them enough shade, a winter cold spell and throw in a few handfuls of slow-release orchid fertiliser and they will present you with a profusion of spring flowers.

Star-rock spider-orchid

There are plenty of native ground orchids in South Australia. They appear in late winter to early spring but you need to walk slowly and have a keen eye, for they are tiny and easily overlooked. Once you stop and look, there they are.

Hairy-stem snail orchids

Our path through the forest in Mt Remarkable NP was lined with orchids. The two of us got down on hands and knees to see them properly! As we did so, another family came past and my friend chastised their young son as he was stepping on the orchids. It is easily done. These orchids do not advertise themselves.

I love their names: star-rock spider orchid, mosquito orchid, blue-beard orchid, hairy-stem snail-orchid. Someone, went to a great deal of trouble naming them. We were on our knees in appreciation.

from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: Walking on the Cryogenian, thinking of an Urmetazoan

River red gum in Alligator Gorge

6 September. The second day of our travels north was spent in the Mt Remarkable National Park, near the town of Wilmington, 320kms north of Adelaide. On reflection, this felt like being on the edge of the known world. The countryside north of Wilmington suffers from a severe shortage of rain and is dotted with half-deserted towns and collapsing stone buildings built over a century ago.

My husband and I elected to visit Alligator Gorge within the park. The origin of the name is in dispute. Rest assured, there are no alligators, nor crocodiles in this gorge. You might find a large goanna which looks intimidating but will not rise from the murky depths to grab your leg and refuse to let go. A long time ago, a large goanna raided my Queensland campsite. I learnt that they have an efficient sense of smell, a liking for cheese and powerful jaws.

salt water crocodile in the Daintree River, Queensland. Far away.

This National park was relatively green and we saw may euros, or common wallaroos, on our drive to the gorge. Euros are marsupials – they are smaller than the larger common Western Grey kangaroos and have noticeably darker paws and tails. They did not seem afraid of us, enjoying the grass in open areas, a teenage joey doing circuits round its mum. Visitors to Australia struggle with the many names of our marsupials and tend to call all hopping creatures of this shape, ‘kangaroos’. But we have potoroos, quokkas, bilbies, bandicoots, euros and wallabies to name a few survivors.

a Euro ‘jill’ (female) checking the joey in her pouch

Over time, rivers have cut into the 700 myo quartzite of Mt Remarkable leaving a steep gorge. We made it down the 272 steps, counting all the way. At the end, a small river was running and we did not feel inclined to wade through the slippery Narrows. Instead, we marvelled at the rocks beneath us, where the ripples marks of ancient seas were frozen in time. This is a geologist’s paradise: a moment to ponder the question of the origin of animals.

Ripple Rocks on the descent into Alligator Gorge, Mt Remarkable

These were rocks of the Precambrian (older than 541 million years before present): a period which covers almost 90 percent of Earth’s history. The Precambrian is split into three time spans and the Alligator Gorge rocks belonged to the more recent of those eras: the Proterozoic (good news – this is when oxygen first entered the earth’s atmosphere).

Keep on splitting as geologists do: the Proterozoic is again divided into three periods. The most recent is the Neoproterozoic era from 1,000 to 541 million years ago. We are getting there. More splits: the Neoproterozoic is split into three as well – the middle period of this is the Cryogenian period (cold birth) and the rocks on which we walked on the 24th August, 2020 were formed during the Cryogenian – between 720-635 million years ago.

I am sorry I cannot be more specific on the date.

the rocky Narrows of Alligator Gorge

I can only say we walked on the shore of an estuary or beach formed into rock when nothing lived on the land – since it was a frozen waste without much oxygen. Some call this the time of ‘Snowball Earth’, others, ‘Slushball Earth’. A matter of the degree of freezing.

The big question for scientists is when did animals originate? They evolved before the Ediacaran Period (635-542 million years ago). It is currently agreed that animals originated during the Cryogenian period, either in the depths of the frozen ocean around hydrothermal vents OR close to the ocean surface around a slightly warmer equator. So, we were walking on the rocks formed during the time the first animals appeared.

Another point of interest. The Adelaide Geosyncline or the Adelaide Superbasin (includes the Flinders Ranges, Mt Lofty Ranges and Kangaroo Island) consists of sedimentary rocks (some volcanic) that were deposited during the time of the breakup of the super-continent Rodinia (motherland). Thus, where we were standing in Alligator Gorge was on the eastern shore of Rodinia, an ancient land where the first animals stirred in the superocean of Mirovia.

https://earthlyuniverse.com/cryogenian-glaciations-birth-animals/

What I like most of all was learning this new word, a very important word. Urmetazoan. The urmetazoan, is our common mysterious ancestor living in the Cryogenian Period. What did it look like? – probably like a sponge.

All this science and questions of millions of years, puts our current world’s woes into a little perspective. Such issues were later discussed by our Field Geology Club of SA members, but not resolved, over dinner at the local Wilmington pub.

from Anne in Adelaide, Australia: the rise of the strange.

4 September.

our art installation

The recent Economist magazine has an article about the weird conspiracy and outlandish theories arising during this period of covid19. Stories merge, grow and adapt to current fears. Such oddities have been around for a long time. (Did you know that aliens built the pyramids?)

I cannot understand how people are caught up with such mad ideas to the extent they will go out on the streets, risking contagion, to promote these ideas. To my amazement I have family and friends on FB that have indicated their following of such mad theories.

https://www.economist.com/1843/2018/08/14/following-qanon-into-the-age-of-post-post-truth

But humans are a strange (and brutal) species.

We have our local strange happenings as well. No conspiracy, no madness, just determination and lots of money. And a little bit about art.

Three hundred metres down our road, on the sloping Hills Face Zone, there is a magnificent garden, a garden of over 2 ha with a permanent gardener. We call it the ‘secret’ garden. The owner has allowed locals to wander in his beautiful garden. We marvel at the tendered lawns, the meandering paths, the huge trees, the olive grove, the water features, the views over Adelaide. Often, we have wondered why the owner has not built a house on the level area obviously prepared for one.

This last week, activity started in a strange way. Three or four containers were delivered to the site. Cranes arrived to position them on the slope. What was this all about? Next the containers were painted black. Was the owner going to store material on the site? Another crane arrived and placed a final container upright on the other containers. Was this a mistake? Had they dropped the container in the wrong position? The rumour then arrived that the elderly wealthy businessman was finally going to build a house. That made sense as many people are using this time of Cocid-19 to upgrade their properties. Wrong.

The puzzle was solved yesterday. Another crane arrived and placed three red crosses on top of the upright container. This expensive exercise appeared to be all about creating an art installation. I assume that the owner is a Christian and is making a statement … no harm done, no angry shouting in the streets.

art and belief in our neighbourhood

The art installation, which is what I will call it, can be seen from a great distance. I’m not sure what the council rules are about erecting such a construction. The council official has been seen taking photographs.

Meanwhile, I hope we can still wander in the garden. While doing so, we might reflect on the strangeness of humans.

from Nike in Katerini, Greece: I went to church with a knife …

28 August. I went to church with a knife in my bag. A serrated one. Sometimes such things are necessary.

Carrying the fanouropita to church.

27th of August is the feast day of Saint Fanourios. He is the Saint to whom you pray to reveal lost things. That’s what his name means. Revealer. Tradition is that the evening before his feast day you bake a special cake called a Fanouropita and take it to church to be blessed.
Together with my aunt Βικτωρια Δαμδουνη we went to church with our Fanouropites. Most worshippers were wearing masks and there was at least an attempt at social distancing.

The magnificent cathedral of The Assumption

We placed our cakes on the left side of the church along with all the other cakes and found places to sit to enjoy the service. It was a bakefest. Women prided themselves on their recipes and decoration.

The blessing of the cakes.

After the blessing of the cakes there was a non-social distancing rush to retrieve our cakes and take them home for our families to enjoy. The younger female members especially look forward to this because it said if you place a piece of fanouropita under your pillow that night you will dream of the man you’ll marry.

The knife bandit.

Before we left the church, it happened. I had to use my knife. Other women approached us for a piece of our cake. It’s what you do apparently. You try other people‘s cakes. So, I sliced away and shared our cakes. You don’t have to be a believer it’s just a beautiful tradition to be enjoyed by everyone.