from Rajan in Mumbai, India: COVID CRICKET 20-20

April 11. Cricket! All over the world due to the corona virus pandemic, governments have had to announce a lockdown in their respective countries. Necessarily, therefore, people have to sit at home during the lockdown. Many have never before spent this much time at home. People are in search of ideas to pass time qualitatively and with fun. They are in search of some new games. Here is one fun game that I have created for the people. The name of the game is “COVID CRICKET 20-20”. You can play this game at your home with few and easily available resources. 

Description of the game is as follows:

  1. Number of Teams: 2(Two). Team “A” and Team “B”
  2. Number of players: 1 player in each team
  3. Umpire: 1(One) (optional)
  4. Resources: one die (six faced) OR a set of six playing cards OR six paper chits of size of 2×2 inches.
  5. Rules of the Game:

R (1). The Umpire will toss a coin. Whichever team wins the toss will have the choice to select batting or fielding first. The other team will necessarily have to choose the opposite side.

R (2). If a die is available, well and good. But if not, then you will either use playing cards with numbers 1 to 6 appearing OR six paper chits of size 2×2 inches (on each paper chit you have to write one number between 1 to 6 and then fold it in such a way that none of the players can identify the number written on it from outside)

R(3).  First the fielding team will roll the die, observe the number on the top and record the number in the scorecard (in the format given below).  Next, the batting team will roll the die, observe the number on the top and record it in the scorecard. This will constitute one over. They will have to play until either 20 overs are completed or 7 wickets have fallen, whichever is earlier. [Explanation of ‘wicket’ is given in R(4)]. This means that if 7 wickets have fallen before 20 overs are completed, it will be considered as ‘all out’ for the batting side. Thereafter the roles will reverse; the fielding team will ‘bat’ and the batting side will ‘field’. The same process as mentioned above will be repeated for either 20 overs or till 7 wickets have fallen, whichever is earlier. [All odd number sequences of rolling the die will always be done by the fielding side and all even number sequences of rolling the die will be done by the batting side]

R(4). The difference between the number appearing on the top of the die after the batting team rolls the die (denoted by ‘B’) and the number appearing on the top of the die after the fielding team rolls the die, (denoted by ‘F’) will be the ‘runs’ scored by the batting side in that over. The number of runs for each over will have to be counted and recorded in the scorecard. However, if the difference in any over is zero, it will be considered as one wicket fallen. This too will have to be recorded in the scorecard.

  • For Example:
    • If ‘B’ = 5 & ‘F’ = 3 then the runs in that over is (B-F) = (5-3) = 2
    • If ‘B’ = 3 & ‘F’ = 5 then the runs in that over are (B-F) = (3-5) = -2
    • If ‘B’ = 4 & ‘F’ = 4 then (B-F) = (4-4) = 0. It means one wicket has fallen.

R(5). If there is cheating by any team, then 5 runs will be deducted from the total score of that team. The Umpire’s decision in this regard will be final.

R(6). If time permits, a series of three games may be played.

R(7). The umpire may be paid ‘fees’, such as Tea/Coffee/Snacks, as mutually decided by both the teams, if deemed necessary.

R(8). If the game is required to be stopped before completion, it may be continued again later.

R(9). The team which scores more runs at the end of the game will be declared as the ‘winner’. If the total scores of both the teams are the same, then three more overs have to be played to decide the winner. However, If there is a tie again, the winner shall be decided by tossing a coin.

R(10). In case of use of playing cards or chits instead of a die, then shuffling of the cards or chits prior to picking one by any team should be done by the opposite team so as to avoid cheating.

  • How to play the game:

(I). The Umpire will toss the coin in the presence of both the teams.
(II). The Winning team will choose either to ‘field’ or to ‘bat’. 
(III). The Fielding team will first roll the die and then the batting team will roll it in the first over. A record of the runs or wickets will be maintained in the score card as per the format given below. This process will be repeated for 20 overs or until 7 wickets have fallen, whichever is earlier. Then there will be a change of sides, meaning the fielding side will become the batting side and the batting team will become the fielding side. The same process will be repeated for 20 overs or till 7 wickets have fallen, whichever is earlier. [Do not forget to name the teams (A and B). It will help in recording on the score card.]
(IV). In case you are using chits (1to 6) or playing cards (1to 6), you will shuffle them well and place them in a way that the numbers on the chit or the card are not visible to the players. The rest of the process and rules as explained in the case of a die will be followed fairly and honestly.
(V). The scorecard format:

  • Name of first team: A
    • Name of second team: B
    • Name of Umpire: C
    • Date of Match: DD/MM/YYYY
    • Start time(AM/PM):
    • End time(AM/PM):

The following format of the score card shall be used for both parts: Part I when one team is fielding and the other is batting.Part II when the sides are reversed.

OverNumber on the die/card/chit (fielding side)Number on the die/card/chit (batting side)Difference
1   
2   
3   
4   
5   
6   
7   
8   
9   
10   
11   
12   
13   
14   
15   
16   
17   
18   
19   
20   
                                                             TOTAL 

Score of team A: ( Runs scored – penalty, if applicable)
Score of team B: ( Runs scored – penalty, if applicable)
Number of wickets of team A:
Number of wickets of team B:
Number of overs by team A:
Number of overs by team B:

Winner of the match:

Note: 1.We have worked out many variations in the game. It has not been given here.
           2. Copy right is with Rajan Welukar, Mumbai

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